They might be giants

Are we at the beginnings of a backlash against big tech? Last week the New Yorker published a disruption takedown from Jill Lepore in which she castigated the tech community for its “reckless and ruthless” philosophy of disruption. Read more »

The Big Idea and copyright

The basic premise of copyright law is that copyright protects the expression of an idea and not the idea itself. If we are launching The Big Idea Competition to find the UK’s best children’s story ideas, how will we ensure that those ideas are protected and the creators of those ideas are adequately remunerated? Read more »

#FutureChat recap: Traditional or independent, publishing teamwork counts

When we asked The FutureBook readership to talk to us Friday in our #FutureChat Twitter conversation about who we hear from in publishing -- and who we don't -- they rose to the occasion readily.

Taking a cue from my conversation at the FutureBook Hack with Pan Macmillan's Sara Lloyd, as well as from The Bookseller lead editorial Friday, Voice recognition by Philip Jones, we went in looking for "how, in the current dialogs of the industry! the industry! we so rarely seem to hear from traditionally published authors, in particular." Read more »

Giving voice to innovation: Add yours in our #FutureChat

Each Friday at 4 p.m. London time, 11 a.m. New York time, join us for a conversation on Twitter, hashtagged #FutureChat – we’d love to have you with us. Read more »

Amazon's dramatic shift

Amazon is seeking a ‘dramatic’ shift in terms, according to Hachette Livre chief executive Arnaud Nourry. The word slipped out during Nourry’s presentation at parent company Lagardere’s investor day, held on 28th May. Read more »

Pan Macmillan’s Lloyd at FutureBook Hack: “Ask what you can do for readers”

“I think we haven’t done the great things yet.”

Are you an author? If so, would it surprise you to know that that line came from a publisher?

It did, and Sara Lloyd, Pan Macmillan’s digital and communications director, was set on making sure that the participant-hackers of the first-ever FutureBook Hack understood that she -- as a representative of a major power in UK publishing -- knew how much the industry! the industry! needs to take things to the next level. Read more »

FutureBook Hack was a legal high for publishing

As I emerged blinking from into Torrington Street W.1 at 430pm from the UK's first ever #FutureBookHack I felt a kind of elation about the future of the publishing industry that I hadn't felt for some time.
 
I also felt exhausted -  32 hours earlier I had been helping my son Jack with stocking fridges with essential supplies, unloading a mountain of beanbags from a white van and plugging in seemingly hundreds of extension cables. Hackers apparently march on their stomachs, require soft padding for their posteriors and need to be constantly connected. Read more »

FutureBook Hack: 40% women and proud of it

“If all these guys can do it, I can do it.”

Among the many accomplishments of The Bookseller-led FutureBook Hack of this past weekend – my colleague Benedicte Page’s write-up of the category winners is here -- one of the proudest is a 40-percent representation of women among the hacker-participants. Read more »

FutureBook Hackers at work: Did we tell them enough?

“Shouldn’t we have told them more?”

As the mists rise off the beanbags here at the Roberts Building on the campus of University College London, the FutureBook Hack has about 19 hacker-participants at work. FutureBook-pink blankets still cover some shoulders. The smell of breakfast being set up is encouraging.

It’s early morning. More teammates will join these. Read more »

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