Overfunding and Under-delivering | @Tom_Chalmers

The Next Big Thing – surely it’s got to come online; that is where all the Next Big Things happen. It’s highly likely to and it is great to see the pace picking up in the publishing industry with all the new digital ventures and initiatives. Particularly against the shadow of Amazon’s ceaselessly efficient business land-grab, the desire to spread the wealth and create competitions makes total sense. Read more »

Twitter interview with Peter Hudson of BitLit

To paraphrase Noel Coward, it’s extraordinary how potent cheap clichés are.

Just when I was going to tell you that e-book bundling must be in the water in the evergreen Great Northwest area of the US and Canada, I found out I may not be kidding after all. Read more »

Tags:

FutureBook Innovation Awards shortlists

If there's one constant in the publishing business right now, it is the growing recognition of the importance of innovation. Read more »

iOS 7: Doing it for the kids

One of the less remarked upon features of iOS 7, the new mobile operating system for iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch, has been the arrival—at last!—of a Kids category for the App Store. Read more »

Blink

Devices are now part of our our bookish culture. It is hard now to imagine in the creation of any new book a scenario where there isn't at least one conversation about what device a piece of content might best work on. However, for most publishers right now that conversation might start and end with the Kindle, or its nearest e-ink competitor. Read more »

Startup profile - Glipho

What is your company name? 

Glipho.

Where are you based? Read more »

FutureBook Innovation Awards - open for entry

Excited to announce that the FutureBook Innovation awards are now open. Launched 3 years ago, the awards were the first of their kind to recognise publishing innovation. Read more »

How do you make money when everything is going free?

Stop worrying about the price of books, or music, or art, going to zero. It’s happening. It’s happened. There is no going back.

So now that we’ve accepted that, how do we answer the really interesting question of the twenty-first century: how do we take advantage of the unique, amazing features of a connected society to finance the profitable creation of art and culture? Read more »

Don't tell me the truth about Amazon

In a letter to its membership posted last week Oren Teicher, chief executive of the American Booksellers Association, has urged his members to use their trusted voices to tell their customers the truth about Amazon. He writes: "You and your bookselling colleagues know the real narrative of the Amazon story, but it’s important that we keep in mind the viewpoint and experience of our customers. Read more »