eBooks

Digital awards winners: fit for the future

Faber was last night awarded the Digital Strategy of The Year gong at The Bookseller’s Industry Awards; E-books by Sainsbury’s was named e-bookseller of the year; and NetGalley won the Supply Chain Innovation Award, this final award sponsored by BIC. Read more »

Buggy whipped into collaboration

“Most of you won’t change. Most of you will stick to the tried and true for as long as possible. Most of you will think of digital as a sideline until you become the sideline.” Read more »

Let’s get ready to hack

This week The Bookseller lifts the lid on a project we’ve been working on for six months. The FutureBook Hack is the UK’s first ever industry-wide book hackathon. WME agent Simon Trewin pitched the idea at FutureBook last year, after his own experience at The Publishing Hackathon, run by the Perseus Book Group with WME in the US a year ago. Read more »

A licensing model for fan fiction

Fan fiction is an eternally popular genre by which a reader writes their own stories featuring the characters, plots and settings of their favourite books. In almost all cases, these stories are written and published without the consent of the author. The unhappy outcome is so often that the fan writer is infringing the copyright of their beloved author and the author (or their publisher) face the prospect of resolving the issue by suing their own readers. Read more »

Publishing's messy re-mix

Publishing is a messy business. Many of its practices and some of its thinking pre-date digital. Some of it pre-dates computers. Its digital journey will not be linear, and even if it emerges fully-formed from this electronic swamp, chances are that it will still be a messy business. Read more »

The e-book in front is a book

Last week in The Bookseller we looked at the paperback market, and how the format might change now that e-books take up a large chunk of sales that would otherwise have been captured by the print book. But the corollary to this is how the e-book will change, as the digital format matures. Read more »

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Changing the DNA of the reader

Are readers fixed in how they read? One of the frustrations around the digital transition is that despite all of the under-the-hood changes to publishing, this digital re-wiring has stopped at the reader. Readers, by and large, read now how they did before e-books ever existed. Read more »

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Innovation is in the blood

If there was one dominant theme coming of out the London Book Fair last week it was of an industry taking a pause, drawing in a big deep breath and working out what comes next. At Digital Minds, the author Nick Harkaway said that publishers liked to reach a plateau and then wait for the next innovation to run them down. In my Leader column for The Bookseller last week, I took issue with this. Just because the activity isn’t visible, and the answers are not forthcoming, does not mean that publishing isn’t thinking about it. Read more »

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The end of the beginning

After the excesses of the early years, did we all wake up in 2013 with a digital hangover? It can sometimes feel like it. Coming off the back of three years of treble-digit e-book growth, last year’s growth rate, of around 20%, was a detoxifier. In truth though, this party has barely even begun. As Amara’s Law argues, we tend to overestimate the impact of digital changes in the short term, but underestimate them in the long run. Read more »

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Riding the Rift

Last week’s acquisition of virtual reality outfit Oculus by Facebook raises some interesting questions for the future of the book. Read more »

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