Books

#FutureChat: Authors in the hot zone

Each Friday, join us for a #FutureChat session, live on Twitter, at 4 p.m. London time, 11 a.m. New York time, 8 a.m. Los Angeles, 5 p.m. Berlin, 3 p.m. GMT. 

Crazy from the heat Read more »

#FutureChat recap: Can publishers compete with Amazon?

When we asked The FutureBook readers to add their voices to a week already loud with news of Amazon, our live #FutureChat discussion turned out to be a fine warm-up for the next Bookseller essay-writing competition (deadline 18 July):

Can publishers compete with Amazon?

The tone of the group's lively conversation was less contentious than pointed, as in author Heather Sunseri's comments: Read more »

Forget the Rubicon: #FutureChat crosses the Amazon

Each Friday, join us for a #FutureChat session, live on Twitter, at 4 p.m. London time, 11 a.m. New York time, 8 a.m. Los Angeles, 5 p.m. Berlin, 3 p.m. GMT.
Read more »

Faber's Griffiths on audio at FutureBook Hack: Listen for the consumer

“Who, exactly, are you going to inspire to buy audio?”

“In 23 years, I’ve never heard anyone say, ‘Have you heard the new Zadie Smith?’”

A compelling, even moving appeal has come from Hannah Griffiths, Faber & Faber’s publishing director, at the weekend’s FutureBook Hack – the UK’s first industry-wide publishing hackathon. The event is presented by The Bookseller in association with publisher-partners, including Faber, as well as a host of sponsors. Read more »

What’s Love Got To Do With It? by @Tom_Chalmers

The book world is undoubtedly a passion industry – writers are usually driven by aspiration, publishers should be fuelled by creativity in producing the best books they possibly can, and a love of books must be fundamental to any bookseller. Read more »

How do you make money when everything is going free?

Stop worrying about the price of books, or music, or art, going to zero. It’s happening. It’s happened. There is no going back.

So now that we’ve accepted that, how do we answer the really interesting question of the twenty-first century: how do we take advantage of the unique, amazing features of a connected society to finance the profitable creation of art and culture? Read more »

Crap Towns returns

One of the strange things about being a pioneer is that you don’t know you’re doing it. This time ten years ago, I was nervously awaiting the release of Crap Towns and to me it seemed like just another book. It was one that was obviously important to me personally, and one that I hoped would make people laugh and strike a few chords and possibly give a few corrupt local politicians and hopeless MPs a kick up the backside. But that was about as far as my thinking went. Read more »

We STILL Need To Talk About Culture

With the London Book Fair ahead of me, and with it a debate on Amazon’s role in the publishing industry, I’ve been asking myself a few questions (which is as weird as it sounds by the way) about our industry.

The question I keep coming back to is culture, specifically the culture that dominates the publishing workforce. Lots has been said about the new skillset that publishers require, but not so much about the new culture publishers require. The one is irrelevant without the other. Read more »

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